Below are links to several studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of Corps – both in terms of outcomes for Corpsmembers and project outcomes for partners.

 

Public Lands Service Corps (PLSC) Evaluation – 2013
  • Mat Duerden, Michael Edwards, Telyn Peterson
  • Brigham Young University, North Carolina State University

The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the impact of the Corps experience on participants in terms of targeted outcomes (e.g., civic engagement, leadership, etc.), their intentions to pursue additional education, and their confidence to obtain employment. Statistically significant increases were observed across all outcome measures in contrast to the general population comparison group.

CLICK HERE

 


Public Lands Service Corps (PLSC) Evaluation – 2012
  • Mat Duerden, Michael Edwards, Robin Lizzo
  • Texas A&M University, Brigham Young University

The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the impact of the Corps experience on participants in terms of targeted outcomes (e.g., civic engagement, leadership, etc.), their intentions to pursue natural resource education and career paths, and their intentions to participate in outdoor recreation activities. Significant increases were observed across all outcome measures in contrast to the general population comparison group.

CLICK HERE

 


Public Lands Service Corps (PLSC) Evaluation – 2011
  • Mat Duerden, Michael Edwards, Robin Lizzo
  • Texas A&M University

The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the impact of the Corps experience on participants both in terms of targeted outcomes (e.g., civic engagement, leadership, etc.) and their intentions to pursue natural resource education and career paths and participate in outdoor recreation activities. Significant increases were observed across all outcome measures in contrast to the comparison group.

CLICK HERE

 


Conservation Corps Project Analysis – 2012
  • Booz Allen Hamilton on behalf of National Park Service Facility Management Division

The National Park Service (NPS) Park Facility Maintenance Division (PFMD) conducted a project analysis to determine how the costs of engaging a Conservation Corps to accomplish cyclic maintenance activities at national parks compared with the costs of using contractor or NPS crews. The project analysis determined that, on average, using conservation crews instead of NPS crews saved 65% with the minimum savings just 3% and the maximum savings 87%. The analysis found that the savings using conservation corps instead of contractor crews were even more significant with average savings of 83% and over $130,000 per project.

CLICK HERE

 


The Voice of Corps Participants – A Qualitative Analysis of the Conservation Corps Experience – 2013
  • Andrew Lacanienta, Mat Duerden, Mike Edwards
  • Brigham Young University, North Carolina State University

This report provides an overview of the analysis and findings of qualitative data gathered from 2013 Conservation Corps participants. At the conclusion of participant’s time in the corps they were administered a survey consisting of primarily quantitative questions and one qualitative open-ended question that read, “Please share with us one or two sentences that best summarize your conservation corps experience.”

CLICK HERE

 


A Consensual Qualitative Research Study of the Transformation from High School Dropout to Graduate: Corpsmember Outcomes and Influencing Factors  – 2013
  • Prepared for Urban Corps of San Diego County
  • Prepared by Jayne E. Smith, Old Dominion University

The purpose of this study was to better understand the Corpsmember process of change and long-term outcomes from the perspective of Urban Corps of San Diego County (UCO) graduates. This study also aimed to identify relevant program factors, and additional risk and protective factors that impact Corpsmember change and outcomes.

CLICK HERE

 


National Evaluation of Youth Corps – Findings at Follow-Up – 2011
  • Prepared for Corporation for National and Community Service
  • Prepared by Abt Associates

This study of youth corps used an experimental design in order to compare the experiences of youth corps members with those of similar individuals who applied to the program over the same time period (June 2006 through July 2007) but who were randomly assigned to a control group. The research questions that guided the impact study design were: 1. What are the impacts of youth corps participation on Corpsmembers’: educational outcomes (e.g., attainment, aspirations); employment-related outcomes (e.g., employment status, wages and earnings, number of employers, participation in training, total income); civic engagement and life skills (e.g., social trust, volunteering and community participation and responsibility, perceived service efficacy); and risky behaviors (e.g., alcohol and substance abuse, criminal offence and incarceration)? – and 2. Do impacts vary by subgroups defined by Corpsmember demographics or program participation characteristics? If so, what are the impacts in each subgroup?

CLICK HERE

 

 

(Photo – USDA, Preston Keres – Montana Conservation Corps)